1887

Abstract

Two Gram-negative, aerobic, motile bacteria strains were isolated from leaf spot disease of . Strain hsmgli-8 has 99.86 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to LY10J, and the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to 58 (97.2 %), then JCM 2400 (97.18 %), CFBP 3225, CFBP 6111 and DSM 14939 (all 97.12 %), and less than 97.1 % similarity to other recognized species. In phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene and multilocus sequence data, the two novel strains form a separate branch, indicating that they do not belong to any group and subgroup, and should belong to a novel species within the genus . This assertion is also supported by the results of genome average nucleotide identity analysis. The major fatty acids are C, C 7 and/or C 6, C 7 and/or C 6. Polar lipids include phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, aminolipid and seven uncharacterized phospholipids. The predominant respiratory quinone is Q-9. The DNA G+C content is 59.45–59.50 mol%. Based on these data, we propose that the two novel strains should be assigned as a novel species within the genus . We propose that the novel strains be named sp. nov. The type strain is hsmgli-8 (=CFCC 15739=LMG 31544).

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2021-05-17
2022-09-25
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