1887

Abstract

Strains of the genus associated with agronomically important crops such as soybean () are increasingly studied; however, information about symbionts of wild species is scarce. Australia is a genetic centre of wild species and we performed a polyphasic analysis of three strains—CNPSo 4010, CNPSo 4016, and CNPSo 4019—trapped from Western Australian soils with , and , respectively. The phylogenetic tree of the 16S rRNA gene clustered all strains into the superclade; strains CNPSo 4010 and CNPSo 4016 had CCBAU 10071 as the closest species, whereas strain CNPSo 4019 was closer to LMG 18230. The multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) with five housekeeping genes—, , , and —confirmed the same clusters as the 16S rRNA phylogeny, but indicated low similarity to described species, with nucleotide identities ranging from 93.6 to 97.6% of similarity. Considering the genomes of the three strains, the average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values were lower than 94.97 and 59.80 %, respectively, with the closest species. In the phylogeny, strains CNPSo 4010 and CNPSo 4019 grouped with and , respectively, while strain CNPSo 4016 was positioned separately from the all symbiotic species. Other genomic (BOX-PCR), phenotypic and symbiotic properties were evaluated and corroborated with the description of three new lineages of . We propose the names of sp. nov. for CNPSo 4010 (=WSM 4802=LMG 31645) isolated from , sp. nov. for CNPSo 4016 (=WSM 4801=LMG 31649) isolated from and sp. nov. for CNPSo 4019 (=WSM 4799=LMG 31650) isolated from .

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • INCT - Plant-Growth Promoting Microorganisms for Agricultural Sustainability and Environmental Responsibility (Award CNPq 465133/2014-2, Fundação Araucária-STI 043/2019, CAPES)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MariangelaHungria
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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