1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped, aerobic bacterial strain, designated HC2, was isolated from the phycosphere of NIES 144 culture. Strain HC2 was able to grow at pH 4.5–8.0, at 4–32 °C and in the presence of 0–2 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain HC2 was affiliated to the genus and shared the highest sequence similarity with ANJKI2 (98.20 %) and SMS-12 (98.06 %). Strain HC2 contained summed feature 3 (C 7 and/or C 6) and iso-C as the major fatty acids (>10.0 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminophospholipid, one unidentified phospholipid, two unidentified aminolipids and four unidentified lipids. The respiratory quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). The genomic DNA G+C content was 42.0 %. On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain HC2 represents a novel species of the genus for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HC2 (=KCTC 82084=JCM 34116).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Research Foundation of Korea (Award 2019R1A2C2007038)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Chi-YongAhn
  • Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology
    • Principle Award Recipient: Chi-YongAhn
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2021-01-27
2021-10-24
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