1887

Abstract

Two yellow-pigmented, non-motile, Gram-stain-negative, and rod-shaped bacteria, designated TW-4 and TNP-2 were obtained from oil-contaminated soil. Both strains degrade diesel oil, hydrolyse aesculin, DNA, Tween 40 and Tween 60. A phylogenetic analysis based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain TW-4 formed a lineage within the family and clustered as members of the genus . The closest members of strain TW-4 were DSM 12447 (97.9 %, sequence similarity), KSS165-70 (97.8 %), T3-B9 (97.8 %), DSM 12444 (97.7 %), UCT-28 (97.7 %), and STM-24 (97.6 %). The sequence similarity for other members was ≤97.6 %. The genome of strain TW-4 was 4 683 467 bp long with 44 scaffolds and 4280 protein-coding genes. The sole respiratory quinone was Q-10. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C 7 and/or C 6), summed feature 3 (C 7 and/or C 6), C and C 2-OH. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidyl--methylethanolamine (PME) and sphingoglycolipid (SGL). The DNA G+C content of the type strain was 65.0 %. The average nucleotide identity (ANIu) and DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) relatedness values between strain TW-4 and closest members were below the threshold value for species delineation. Based on polyphasic taxonomic analyses, strain TW-4 represents novel species in the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TW-4 (=KACC 21628=NBRC 114364) and strain TNP-2 (=KACC 21629=NBRC 114365) represents an additional strain. Based on new data obtained in this study, it is also proposed to reclassify as a later heterotypic synonym of .

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • JaisooKim , National Research Foundation (KR) , (Award 2019R1F1A1058501)
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2021-01-07
2021-02-26
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