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Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic bacterium, designated strain PeD5, was isolated from a green alga from the Nakdong river of the Republic of Korea. Cells were non-motile cocci, catalase-negative and oxidase-positive. Growth of PeD5 was observed at 25–40 °C (optimum, 35 °C) and pH 5.0–10.0 (optimum, pH 7–8), and in the presence of 0–0.25% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0%). PeD5 contained C, Cω7 11-methyl, summed feature 3 (comprising Cω7 and/or Cω6) and summed feature 8 (comprising Cω7 and/or Cω6) as major cellular fatty acids (>5%) and ubiquinone-10 as the sole isoprenoid quinone. Phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified phospholipid and an unidentified aminolipid were detected as major polar lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of PeD5 was 71.0 mol%. PeD5 was most closely related to HS-69 with a 97.6% 16S rRNA sequence similarity and shared less than 96.3% 16S rRNA sequence similarities with type strains of other species. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that PeD5 formed a phyletic lineage with HS-69 within the genus . On the basis of results of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular analysis, strain PeD5 clearly represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PeD5 (=KACC 19925=JCM 33309).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministry of Environment (KR) (Award NIBR No. 2020-02-001)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Che Ok Jeon
  • National Research Foundation (KR) (Award 2017M3C1B5019250)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Che Ok Jeon
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2020-09-14
2021-08-02
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