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Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, yellow-pigmented, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated zrk23, was isolated from a deep-sea cold seep. The strain was characterized by a polyphasic approach to clarify its taxonomic position. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed zrk23 within the genus and showed the highest similarity to FM6 (97.93 %). Growth occurs at temperatures from 16 to 45 °C (optimum, 30 °C), at pH values between pH 6.0 and 8.5 (optimum, pH 7.0) and in 0–5.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 1.5 %). The major fatty acids were C, C 2-OH and summed feature 8 (Cω7 and/or Cω6). The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-10. Predominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified phosphoglycolipid, three unidentified glycolipids and three unidentified phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 64.69 %. The average nucleotide identity values between zrk23 and the most closely related available genome, of FM6, was 82.21 %, indicating that zrk23 was clearly distinguished from . The analysis of genome sequence of zrk23 revealed that there were many genes associated with degradation of aromatic compounds existing in the genome of zrk23. As a result of the combination of the results of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data, zrk23 was considered to represent a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is zrk23 (=KCTC 72896=MCCC 1K04416).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Chaomin Sun , National Key R and D Program of China , (Award 2018YFC0310800)
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004448
2020-09-14
2020-11-30
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