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Abstract

The family comprises prosthecate bacteria with a dimorphic cell cycle and also non-prosthecate bacteria. Cells of all described species divide by binary fission. Strain 0127_4 was isolated from forest soil in Baden Württemberg (Germany) and determined to be the first representative of the family which divided by budding. Cells of strain 0127_4 were Gram-negative, rod-shaped, prosthecate, motile by means of a polar flagellum, non-spore-forming and non-capsulated. The strain formed small white colonies and grew aerobically and chemo-organotrophically utilizing organic acids, amino acids and proteinaceous substrates. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that this bacterium was related to TH1-2 and DRW22-8 with 91.3 and 89.7% sequence similarity, respectively. Four unidentified glycolipids were detected as the major polar lipids and, unlike all described members of the family , phosphatidylglycerol was absent. The major fatty acids were summed feature 8 (Cω7/Cω6), summed feature 9 (iso-Cω9/C 10-methyl), C and summed feature 3 (C 6/C 7). The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 63.5 %. Based on the present taxonomic characterization, strain 0127_4 represents a novel species of a new genus, gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of is 0127_4 (=DSM 104635=CECT 9243).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Award OV 20/21-1)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jörg Overmann
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2020-08-07
2021-10-17
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