1887

Abstract

and are proposed as new taxa based on sequence data and morphological characters. The phylogenetic analyses based on ITS2-partial LSU rDNA region, β-tubulin and elongation factor 1-α genes showed that and formed well-supported clades and were closely related to , and , and then nested within the complex. The two species differ in their conidial size and shape. The conidia of are larger than those of while the conidial shape of is more ovovoid. The optimal growth temperature of both and is at 20 °C, which is different from those of , and . Comparison of sequence data and morphological characters confirmed the placement of the two undescribed taxa in the genus of .

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Peng Chen , the Applied Basic Research Foundation of Yunnan Province , (Award 2013FA055)
  • Hui Ye , the Natural Science Foundation of China , (Award 31360183)
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2020-08-12
2020-09-20
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