1887

Abstract

A strictly anaerobic predominant bacterium, designated as strain gm001, was isolated from a freshly voided faecal sample collected from a healthy Taiwanese adult. Cells were Gram-stain-negative rods, non-motile and non-spore-forming. Strain gm001 was identified as a member of the genus , and a comparison of 16S rRNA and gene sequences revealed sequence similarities of 98.5 and 93.3 %, respectively, demonstrating that it was most closely related to the type strain of . Phylogenomic tree analysis indicated that the gm001 cluster is an independent lineage of DSM 18205. The average nucleotide identity, digital DNA‒DNA hybridization and average amino acid identity values between strain gm001 and DSM 18205 were 80.9, 28.6 and 83.8 %, respectively, which were clearly lower than the species delineation thresholds. The species-specific genes of this novel species were also identified on the basis of pan-genomic analysis. The predominant menaquinones were MK-11 and MK-12, and the predominant fatty acids were anteiso-C, C and iso-C. Acetate and succinate were produced from glucose as metabolic end products. Taken together, the results indicate that strain gm001 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is gm001 (=BCRC 81118=JCM 33280).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Mitsuo Sakamoto , Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development , (Award JP19gm6010007)
  • Jong-Shian Liou , Ministry of Economic Affairs , (Award Project No. 109-EC-17-A-22–0525)
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004342
2020-07-22
2020-09-20
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