1887

Abstract

Two Gram-stain-negative, facultative anaerobic and non-motile bacteria, strains R11 and S1162, were isolated from soil in the Republic of Korea. Both strains were catalase- and oxidase-positive and contained menaquinone-7 as the major isoprenoid quinone. Strain R11 contained summed feature 3 (C ω7 and/or C ω6), iso-C, C and iso-C 3-OH as major fatty acids and phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified aminophospholipid and an unidentified aminolipid as major polar lipids; while strain S1162 contained summed feature 3 (C ω7 and/or C ω6), iso-C, iso-C 3-OH, C and summed feature 9 (10-methyl C and/or iso-C ω9) as major fatty acids and phosphatidylethanolamine and an unidentified aminophospholipid as major polar lipids. The DNA G+C contents of strains R11 and S1162 calculated from their whole genomes were 42.7 and 42.9 mol%, respectively. Results of phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain R11 formed a phylogenetic lineage with YC7004 and strain S1162 formed a distinct phyletic lineage from closely related type strains within the genus . Strains R11 and S1162 were most closely related to YC7004 and BXN5-31 with 97.78 and 97.23% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular analysis, strains R11 and S1162 represent two novel species of the genus , for which the names sp. nov. and sp. nov. are proposed, respectively. The type strains of and are R11 (=KACC 21228=JCM 33472) and S1162 (=KACC 21669=JCM 33916), respectively.

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2020-07-15
2020-11-25
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