1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium, designated XJ4, was isolated from oil-contaminated water, collected from Xinjiang Province, north-west PR China (45° 1′ 27″ N, 85° 6′ 14″ E). Growth occurred at 20–45 °C (optimum, 30 °C) and pH 6.0–10.0 (optimum, pH 6.0–7.0). Strain XJ4 could tolerate up to 7 % (w/v) NaCl and grow optimally in the absence of NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain XJ4 belonged to the genus , and that was closely related to cai42 (97.2 %), SP32 (97.0 %) and JA296 (97.0 %). The average nucleotide identity values between XJ4 and three type strains were 77.9, 77.6 and 71.9 %, respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain XJ4 was 69.5 mol%. The sole respiratory quinone was Q-10. The major cellular fatty acid was summed feature 8 (C ω7 and/or C ω6), C and 11-methyl C ω7. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, unidentified phospholipids, an unidentified aminolipid and unidentified lipids. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, strain XJ4 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XJ4 (=CGMCC 1.13778=LMG 30952).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Methodological research and application of oil field ecological profit and loss assessment (Award 2016E-1205)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Lei Wang
  • sub-project of National Science and Technology Major Project (Award 2016ZX05040002-005-001)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Lei Wang
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award Grant No. 41977198)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Lei Wang
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2020-06-26
2021-10-24
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