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Abstract

Strain B66 was isolated from a marine water sample collected at Al Ruwais, located on the northern tip of Qatar. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic and short- rod-shaped with a polar flagellum. The isolate was able to grow at 15–45 °C (optimum, 30 °C), at pH 5–11 (optimum, pH 6.5–8) and with 0–6 % NaCl. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain B66 was affiliated with the family , sharing the highest sequence similarities to the genera (93.7–95.4 %), (94.0–95.1 %), (93.3–93.7 %), (92.0–93.7 %), (93.2–93.3 %) and (92.9 %). In the phylogenetic trees, strain B66 demonstrated the novel organism formed a distinct lineage closely associated with and . Major fatty acids were C, summed feature 3 (C ω/C ω6/iso-C 2-OH and iso-C 3-OH. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-8 and the major polar lipids are phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The DNA G+C content derived from the genome was 43.2 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, phylogenetic and genomic data, strain B66 is considered to represent a novel species and genus for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is B66 (=QCC B003/17=LMG 30288 =CCUG 70703).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Rashmi Fotedar , Qatar National Research Fund , (Award NPRP 6-647-1-127)
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004256
2020-07-02
2020-09-28
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