1887

Abstract

Two novel strains, designated SYSU L10167 and SYSU L10180, were isolated from sediment sampled at Dabancheng saline lake in Xinjiang, PR China. A polyphasic approach was used to clarify the taxonomic positions of the two strains. Cells of the isolates were curved ring-like, horseshoe-shaped or rod-shaped, non-motile and non-spore-forming. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, heterotrophic and rose-pigmented. The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains SYSU L10167 and SYSU L10180 formed a distinct lineage within the genus . Strains SYSU L10167 and SYSU L10180 showed highest similarities to KCTC 23150 (98.0 and 97.4%, respectively). Results of genomic analyses (including average nucleotide identity, digital DNA–DNA hybridization and the marker gene tree) and pan-genome analysis further confirmed that strains SYSU L10167 and SYSU L10180 were separate from each other and other species of the genus . The draft genomes of the isolates had sizes of 5.5–5.7 Mb and reflected their major physiological capabilities. Based on phenotypic, physiological, chemotaxonomic and genotypic characterization, we propose that the isolates represent two novel species, for which the names sp. nov. and sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains of the species are SYSU L10167 (=KCTC 72390=CGMCC 1.17521) and SYSU L10180 (=KCTC 72391=CGMCC 1.17278).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Yong-Hong Liu , National Natural Science Foundation of China , (Award 91751206)
  • Wen-Jun Li , Department of Education, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (CN) , (Award 2017E01031)
  • Wen-Jun Li , National Key R&D Program of China , (Award 2017FY100300)
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004237
2020-05-28
2020-12-01
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