1887

Abstract

Eight Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped bacterial strains were isolated from faeces of Tibetan antelopes on the Tibet-Qinghai Plateau of China. Genomic sequence analysis showed that the strains belong to the genera (strains 299 and 340), (strains 2184, 2185, 2183 and 2189) and (strains 160 and 143), respectively, with a percentage of similarity for the 16S rRNA gene under the species threshold of 98.7 % except for strains 160 and 143 with CAU 1183 (98.8 %). The genome sizes (and genomic G+C contents) were 3.1 Mb (49.4 %), 2.5 Mb (64.9 %), 2.4 Mb (66.1 %) and 4.1 Mb (37.1 %) for the type strains 299, 2183, 2184 and 160, respectively. Two sets of the overall genome relatedness index values between our isolates and their corresponding closely related species were under species thresholds (95 % for average nucleotide identity, and 70 % for digital DNA–DNA hybridization). These results, together with deeper genotypic, genomic, phenotypic and biochemical analyses, indicate that these eight isolates should be classified as representing four novel species. Strain 299 (=CGMCC 1.16320=JCM 33611) is proposed as representing sp. nov.; strain 2184 (=CGMCC 1.16417=DSM 106203) is proposed as representing sp. nov.; strain 2183 (=CGMCC 1.16416=DSM 106264) is proposed as representing sp. nov.; and strain 160 (=CGMCC 1.16367=DSM 106186) is proposed as representing sp. nov.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Research Units of Discovery of Unknown Bacteria and Function, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (Award 2018RU010)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Dong Jin
  • Research Units of Discovery of Unknown Bacteria and Function, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (Award 2018RU010)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jing Yang
  • Research Units of Discovery of Unknown Bacteria and Function, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (Award 2018RU010)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Shan Lu
  • Research Units of Discovery of Unknown Bacteria and Function, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (Award 2018RU010)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jianguo Xu
  • Sanming Project of Medicine in Shenzhen (Award SZSM201811071)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jianguo Xu
  • National Key R&D Program of China (Award 2018YFC1200102)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Dong Jin
  • National Science and Technology Major Project of China (Award 2018ZX10305409-003)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Zhihong Ren
  • National Science and Technology Major Project of China (Award 2018ZX10712001-007)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Jing Yang
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2020-06-04
2021-08-02
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