1887

Abstract

Strain ATCC 31180 was isolated from soil collected in Hyde Park, Massachusetts (USA), and found to produce the polyether antibiotic lasalocid. The name ‘’ has been in common use since 1974, without a recognized taxonomic description. The most closely related type cultures determined by rRNA gene sequence similarity were DSM 41677 (100 %) and DSM 40089 (100 %). OrthoANI values with and were 95.50 and 94.41 %, respectively. Chemotaxonomic characteristics supported inclusion within the genus . The cell wall peptidoglycan contained -diaminopimelic acid, and the major whole-cell sugars were glucose and ribose. Polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified lipid and one unidentified glycolipid. The major menaquinones detected were MK9(H), MK9(H) and MK9(H). The major cellular fatty acids were anteisoC, anteisoC, isoC, isoC and anteisoC. Its DNA had a G+C content of 72.6 %. Differentiation of ATCC 31180 from the closely related species was evident from digital DNA–DNA hybridization values of 61.80 and 56.90 % for and respectively. Significant differences were seen in the polyphasic phenotypic analyses. ATCC 31180 produced lasalocid, grew from 10 to 45 °C, pH4-8 and in the presence of 0–10 % NaCl, 0.01 % NaN and 1 % phenol. Melanin was produced; HS and indole were not. Nitrate was not reduced. Spore chains were retinaculum-apertum and spore surfaces were smooth. Spore colour, mycelia colour and soluble pigment production were medium-dependent. The proposed name is sp. nov.; the type strain being ATCC 31180 (=NRRL 3382=DSM 46487).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Not Applicable , Zoetis (US)
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004135
2020-03-31
2020-06-02
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/70/5/3076.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004135&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Waksman SA, Henrici AT. The nomenclature and classification of the actinomycetes. J Bacteriol 1943; 46:337–341 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Anderson AS, Wellington EM. The taxonomy of Streptomyces and related genera. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2001; 51:797–814 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Westley JW. Polyether antibiotics: Naturally occurring acid ionophores 2, 1st ed. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press; 1983
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Berger J, Rachlin AI, Scott WE, Sternbach LH, Goldberg MW. The isolation of three new crystalline antibiotics from Streptomyces . J Am Chem Soc 1951; 73:5295–5298 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Shirling EB, Gottlieb D. Methods for characterization of Streptomyces species. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1966; 16:313–340 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Westley JW, Evans RH, Harvey G, Pitcher RG, Pruess DL et al. Biosynthesis of lasalocid. I. incorporation of 13C and 14C labelled substrates into lasalocid a. J Antibiot 1974; 27:288–297[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Westley JW. The polyether ether antibiotics: monocarboxylic acid ionophores. Ann Rep Med Chem 1975; 10:246–256
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Golder HM, Lean IJ. A meta-analysis of lasalocid effects on rumen measures, beef and dairy performance, and carcass traits in cattle. J Anim Sci 2016; 94:306–326 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Yoon S-H, Ha S-M, Kwon S, Lim J, Kim Y et al. Introducing EzBioCloud: a taxonomically United database of 16S rRNA gene sequences and whole-genome assemblies. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2017; 67:1613–1617 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Goodfellow M, Busarakam K, Idris H, Labeda DP, Nouioui I et al. Streptomyces asenjonii sp. nov., isolated from hyper-arid Atacama desert soils and emended description of Streptomyces viridosporus Pridham et al. 1958. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 2017; 110:1133–1148 [CrossRef][PubMed][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Röttig A, Atasayar E, Meier-Kolthoff JP, Spröer C, Schumann P et al. Streptomyces jeddahensis sp. nov., an oleaginous bacterium isolated from desert soil. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2017; 67:1676–1682 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Kumar S, Stecher G, Li M, Knyaz C, Tamura K. MEGA X: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis across computing platforms. Mol Biol Evol 2018; 35:1547–1549 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Hillis DM, Bull JJ. An empirical test of bootstrapping as a method for assessing confidence in phylogenetic analysis. Syst Biol 1993; 42:182–192 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Kieser T, Bibb MJ, Buttner MJ, Chater KF, Hopwood DA et al. The John Innes Foundation. Norwich, U.K 2000
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Gardner SN, Slezak T, Hall BG. kSNP3.0: SNP detection and phylogenetic analysis of genomes without genome alignment or reference genome. Bioinformatics 2015; 31:2877–2878 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Andrew Rambaut FigTree v1.4.4. Institute of evolutionary biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh. http://tree.bio.ed.ac.uk/software/figtree/
  17. Auch AF, von Jan M, Klenk H-P, Göker M. Digital DNA-DNA hybridization for microbial species delineation by means of genome-to-genome sequence comparison. Stand Genomic Sci 2010; 2:117–134 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Meier-Kolthoff JP, Auch AF, Klenk H-P, Göker M. Genome sequence-based species delimitation with confidence intervals and improved distance functions. BMC Bioinformatics 2013; 14:60 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Chun J, Oren A, Ventosa A, Christensen H, Arahal DR et al. Proposed minimal standards for the use of genome data for the taxonomy of prokaryotes. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2018; 68:461–466 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Nguyen TM, Kim J. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of Streptomyces polymachus sp. nov. isolated from soil. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2015; 65:2385–2390 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Xu P, Li W-J, Tang S-K, Zhang Y-Q, Chen G-Z et al. Naxibacter alkalitolerans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel member of the family 'Oxalobacteraceae' isolated from China. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2005; 55:1149–1153 [CrossRef][PubMed][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Gordon RE, Smith MM. Proposed group of characters for the separation of Streptomyces and Nocardia. J Bacteriol 1955; 69:147–150 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Slama N, Mankai H, Ayed A, Mezhoud K, Rauch C et al. Streptomyces tunisiensis sp. nov., a novel Streptomyces species with antibacterial activity. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 2014; 105:377–387 [CrossRef][PubMed][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Také A, Inahashi Y, Ōmura S, Takahashi Y, Matsumoto A. Streptomyces boninensis sp. nov., isolated from soil from a limestone cave in the Ogasawara islands. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2018; 68:1795–1799 [CrossRef][PubMed][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Tresner HD, Hayes JA, Backus EJ. Differential tolerance of streptomycetes to sodium chloride as a taxonomic aid. Appl Microbiol 1968; 16:1134–1136 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Hamid ME. Variable antibiotic susceptibility patterns among Streptomyces species causing actinomycetoma in man and animals. Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob 2011; 10:24 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Ayed A, Slama N, Mankai H, Bachkouel S, ElKahoui S et al. Streptomyces tunisialbus sp. nov., a novel Streptomyces species with antimicrobial activity. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 2018; 111:1571–1581 [CrossRef][PubMed][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Williams ST, Goodfellow M, Alderson G, Wellington EM, Sneath PH et al. Numerical classification of Streptomyces and related genera. J Gen Microbiol 1983; 129:1743–1813 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Kumar V, Bharti A, Gusain O, Bisht GS. Scanning electron microscopy of Streptomyces without use of any chemical fixatives. Scanning 2011; 33:446–449 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Hüttel W, Spencer JB, Leadlay PF. Intermediates in monensin biosynthesis: a late step in biosynthesis of the polyether ionophore monensin is crucial for the integrity of cation binding. Beilstein J Org Chem 2014; 10:361–368 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Mouslim J, Cuer A, David L, Tabet JC. Biosynthetic study on the polyether carboxylic antibiotic, nigericin production and biohydroxylation of grisorixin by nigericin-producing Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL B-1865. J Antibiot 1995; 48:1011–1014 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Takahashi Y, Nakamura H, Ogata R, Matsuda N, Hamada M et al. Kijimicin, a polyether antibiotic. J Antibiot 1990; 43:441–443 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Day LE, Chamberlin JW, Gordee EZ, Chen S, Gorman M et al. Biosynthesis of monensin. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1973; 4:410–414 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Pridham TG, Hesseltine CW, Benedict RG. A guide for the classification of streptomycetes according to selected groups; placement of strains in morphological sections. Appl Microbiol 1958; 6:52–79 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Lee I, Ouk Kim Y, Park S-C, Chun J. OrthoANI: an improved algorithm and software for calculating average nucleotide identity. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2016; 66:1100–1103 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Frommer W. Zur Systematik Der actinomycin bildenden Streptomyceten. Archiv. Mikrobiol. 1959; 32:187–206 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Prosser BLT, Palleroni NJ. Streptomyces longwoodensis sp. nov. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1976; 26:319–322 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004135
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004135
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error