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Abstract

A moderately thermophilic, neutrophilic, aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium, strain 3729k, was isolated from a thermal spring of the Chukotka Peninsula, Arctic region, Russia. It grew chemoorganoheterotrophically, utilizing proteinaceous substrates, including highly rigid keratins as well as various polysaccharides (glucomannan, locust bean gum, gum guar and xanthan gum). The major fatty acids of strain 3729k were iso-C (60.9%), iso-C (12.0%), C (9.9%) and iso-C (7.4%). Isoprenoid quinones were Q-8 (95%) and Q-9 (5%). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine and three unidentified polar lipids. Strain 3729k was inhibited by chloramphenicol, neomycin, novobiocin, kanamycin, tetracycline, ampicillin and polymyxin B, but resistant to rifampicin, vancomycin and streptomycin. At the same time, strain 3729k inhibited growth of and its genome possessed genes for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria (a single putative bacteriocin and several secreted lysozymes and peptidoglycan lytic transglycosylases). The DNA G+C content was 69.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis placed strain 3729k into a distinct species/genus-level branch within the family (). Phylogenetic analysis of 120 conservative protein sequences of all with validly published names and publicly available genomic sequences supported a species-level position of strain 3729k within the genus . Pairwise ANI values between strain 3729k and other species were of 75–80 %, supporting the proposal of a novel species. Accordingly, sp. nov., with the type strain 3729k (=VMK В−3232=DSM 105847), was proposed.

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2020-03-16
2020-06-04
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