1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, leaf-associated bacterium, designated JS23, was isolated from surface-sterilized leaf tissue of an oil palm grown in Singapore and was investigated by polyphasic taxonomy. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and 180 conserved genes in the genome of several members of revealed that strain JS23 formed a distinct evolutionary lineage independent of other taxa within the family . The predominant ubiquinone was Q-8. The primary polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, and an unidentified aminophospholipid. The major fatty acids were C, summed feature 3 (C 7 /C 6) and summed feature 8 (C 7 /C 6). The size of the genome is 5.36 Mbp with a DNA G+C content of 66.2 mol%. Genomic relatedness measurements such as average nucleotide identity, genome-to-genome distance and digital DNA–DNA hybridization clearly distinguished strain JS23 from the closely related genera , , , , , , and . Furthermore, average amino acid identity values and the percentages of conserved proteins, 56.0–68.4 and 28.2–45.5, respectively, were well below threshold values for genus delineation and supported the assignment of JS23 to a novel genus. On the basis of the phylogenetic, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and phylogenomic evidence, strain JS23 is proposed to represent a novel species of a new genus within the family , for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed with the type strain of JS23 (= DSM 27307=KACC 17592).

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2020-03-23
2020-06-02
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