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Abstract

Strain JC651 was isolated from a sediment sample collected from Chilika lagoon, which is one of the world’s most important brackish water lakes with estuarine characteristics. Colonies of this strain are light pink and cells are Gram-stain negative, spherical to pear shaped and form rosettes. Strain JC651 grows well up to pH 9.0 and tolerates up to 5 % NaCl (w/v). The respiratory quinone is MK6. The detected major fatty acids are C ω9 and C. Its polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified phospholipid, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine. Strain JC651 shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (97.8%) to the type species of the genus , UC8. The genome size of strain JC651 is 6.2 Mb with a G+C content of 62.4 mol%. For the resolution of the phylogenetic congruence of the novel strain, the phylogeny was also reconstructed with the sequences of 92 core genes. Based on the phylogenetic analyses, low digital DNA–DNA hybridization values (19.5%), low (74.9%) genome average nucleotide identity results, chemotaxonomic characteristics and differential physiological properties, strain JC651 is recognized as a new species of the genus for which we propose the name sp. nov. The type strain is JC651 (=KCTC 72178=NBRC 113926).

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2020-03-04
2020-06-04
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