1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, flagellated and rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain SM1901, was isolated from a brown algal sample collected from Kings Bay, Svalbard, Arctic. Strain SM1901 grew at −4‒30 °C and with 0–7.0 % (w/v) NaCl. It reduced nitrate to nitrite and hydrolysed DNA and Tween 80. Results of phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SM1901 was affiliated with the genus , showing the highest sequence similarity to the type strain of (97.5%), followed by those of , and (97.3 % for all three). The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C 7 and/or C 6), C, C, iso-C and C 8 and the major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The respiratory quinones were ubiquinones Q-7, Q-8, menaquinones MK-7(H) and MK-8. The genome of strain SM1901 was 4648537 nucleotides long and encoded a variety of cold adaptation related genes, providing clues for better understanding the ecological adaptation mechanisms of polar bacteria. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain SM1901 was 40.5 mol%. Based on the polyphasic evidence presented in this paper, strain SM1901 was considered to represent a novel species, constituting a novel psychrotolerant lineage out of the known SF clade encompassed by polar species, within the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SM1901 (=KCTC 72047=MCCC 1K03585).

Keyword(s): sp. nov. , Arctic and Shewanella
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.004022
2020-01-30
2020-02-28
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