1887

Abstract

An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming and rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated N8, was isolated from the interfacial sediment of Taihu Lake in PR China. The strain formed white to blue colonies on R2A agar. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain N8 represented a member of the genus and was most closely related to A1-9 (97.97 %). The average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNAhybridization values between strain N8 and A1-9 based on their whole genomes were 78.8 and 21.7 %, respectively. Q-10 was the main predominant ubiquinone. The major fatty acids were summed feature 8 (Cω7 and/or Cω6), C and C. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 66.1 mol%. The polar lipids comprised phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, one unidentified phospholipid, two unidentified glycolipids and two unidentified lipids. Based on its physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain N8 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is N8=(KACC 21307=MCCC 1K04036).

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2020-01-30
2020-02-28
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