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Abstract

Strain 33A1-SZDP was isolated from a small creek located in Puch, Austria. Strain SP-Ram-0.45-NSY-1 was obtained from a small pond located in Schönramer Moor, Germany. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between the type strain of , currently the only member of the family , and strains 33A1-SZDP and SP-Ram-0.45-NSY-1 of 94.1 and 99.1 %, respectively, suggested affiliation of the two strains with this family. Phylogenetic reconstructions with 16S rRNA gene sequences and phylogenomic analyses with amino acid sequences obtained from 103 single-copy genes suggested that the strains represent a new genus and a new species in the case of strain 33A1-SZDP (=JCM 32978=DSM 107810), and a new species within the genus in the case of strain SP-Ram-0.45-NSY-1 (=JCM 32975=DSM 107809). Cells of strain 33A1-SZDP were motile, pleomorphic, purple-pigmented on agar plates, putatively due to violacein, and showed variable pigmentation in liquid media. They grew chemoorganotrophically and aerobically and tolerated salt concentrations up to 1.2 % NaCl (v/w). The genome size of strain 33A1-SZDP was 3.4 Mbp and the G+C content was 32.2 mol%. For this new genus and new species, we propose the name gen. nov., sp. nov. Cells of strain SP-Ram-0.45-NSY-1 were motile, pleomorphic, red-pigmented and grew chemoorganotrophically and aerobically. They tolerated salt concentrations up to 1.1 % NaCl (v/w). The genome size of strain SP-Ram-0.45-NSY-1 was 3.9 Mbp and the G+C content 29.3 mol%. For the new species within the genus we propose the name sp. nov.

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2020-01-06
2020-11-26
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