1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium with peritrichous flagella, designated strain HB161719, was isolated from coastal sand collected from Tanmen Port in Hainan, PR China. The isolate was found to grow with 2–11 % (w/v) NaCl, at 15–45 °C and pH 6.0–10.0, with an optima of 2–3 % NaCl, 37 °C and pH 7.0, respectively. Chemotaxonomic analysis showed that Q-8 was detected as the sole respiratory quinone and that iso-C and summed features 3, 8 and 9 were the major cellular fatty acids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 58.2 mol%. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the strain showed an affiliation with the genus , sharing 98.7, 98.4, 97.8 and 97.8 % sequence similarities to the closest relatives of ABABA23, SPO729, CC-LN1-12 and GY2, respectively. Low DNA–DNA hybridization values showed that it formed a distinct genomic species. The combined phenotypic and molecular features supported that strain HB161719 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HB161719 (=CGMCC 1.13584=JCM 32688).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Huiqin Huang , Central Public-interest Scientific Institution Basal Research Fund for Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences , (Award 19CXTD-32)
  • Huiqin Huang , Central Public-interest Scientific Institution Basal Research Fund for Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences , (Award 1630052016011)
  • Yonghua Hu , Financial Fund of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs of China , (Award NFZX2018)
  • Huiqin Huang , Key Research and Development Project of Hainan Province , (Award ZDYF2017131)
  • Shixiang Bao , Key Research and Development Project of Hainan Province , (Award ZDYF2019133)
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003945
2020-03-03
2020-06-04
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/70/3/1639.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003945&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. González JM, Mayer F, Moran MA, Hodson RE, Whitman WB. Microbulbifer hydrolyticus gen. nov., sp. nov., and Marinobacterium georgiense gen. nov., sp. nov., two marine bacteria from a lignin-rich pulp mill waste enrichment community. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1997; 47:369–376 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Tang S-K, Wang Y, Cai M, Lou K, Mao P-H et al. Microbulbifer halophilus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from north-west China. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2008; 58:2036–2040 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Camacho M, Del Carmen Montero-Calasanz M, Redondo-Gómez S, Rodríguez-Llorente I, Schumann P et al. Microbulbifer rhizosphaerae sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of the halophyte Arthrocnemum macrostachyum . Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2016; 66:1844–1850 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Nishijima M, Takadera T, Imamura N, Kasai H, An K-D et al. Microbulbifer variabilis sp. nov. and Microbulbifer epialgicus sp. nov., isolated from Pacific marine algae, possess a rod-coccus cell cycle in association with the growth phase. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2009; 59:1696–1707 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Takeshita S, Oda T, Muramatsu T. An improved plate method, in the presence of calcium chloride or sulfuric acid, for simultaneous detection of alginate lyases. Agric Biol Chem 1991; 55:2637–2638
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Dong X, Cai M. Determinative Manual for Routine Bacteriology Beijing: Scientific Press; 2001
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Minnikin DE, O'Donnell AG, Goodfellow M, Alderson G, Athalye M et al. An integrated procedure for the extraction of bacterial isoprenoid quinones and polar lipids. J Microbiol Methods 1984; 2:233–241 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Ruan JS. A rapid determination method for phosphate lipids. Microbiol China 2006; 37:190–193
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Kuykendall LD, Roy MA, O'NEILL JJ, Devine TE. Fatty acids, antibiotic resistance, and deoxyribonucleic acid homology groups of Bradyrhizobium japonicum . Int J Syst Bacteriol 1988; 38:358–361 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Komagata K, Suzuki KI. Lipids and cell-wall analysis in bacterial Systematics. Methods Microbiol 1987; 19:161–207
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Weisburg WG, Barns SM, Pelletier DA, Lane DJ. 16S ribosomal DNA amplification for phylogenetic study. J Bacteriol 1991; 173:697–703 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Yoon S-H, Ha S-M, Kwon S, Lim J, Kim Y et al. Introducing EzBioCloud: a taxonomically United database of 16S rRNA gene sequences and whole-genome assemblies. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2017; 67:1613–1617 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Kumar S, Stecher G T. MEGA 7: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis version 7.0 for bigger datasets. Mol Biol Evol 2016; 3:1870–1874
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Saitou N, Nei M. The neighbor-joining method: a new method for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Mol Biol Evol 1987; 4:406–425 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Felsenstein J. Evolutionary trees from DNA sequences: a maximum likelihood approach. J Mol Evol 1981; 17:368–376 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Fitch WM. Toward defining the course of evolution: minimum change for a specific tree topology. Syst Zool 1971; 20:406–416 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Felsenstein J. Confidence limits on phylogenies: an approach using the bootstrap. Evolution 1985; 39:783–791 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Brettin T, Davis JJ, Disz T, Edwards RA, Gerdes S et al. RASTtk: a modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes. Sci Rep 2015; 5:8365–8370 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Ezaki T, Hashimoto Y, Yabuuchi E. Fluorometric deoxyribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization in microdilution wells as an alternative to membrane filter hybridization in which radioisotopes are used to determine genetic relatedness among bacterial strains. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989; 39:224–229 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Christensen H, Angen O, Mutters R, Olsen JE, Bisgaard M. DNA--DNA hybridization determined in micro-wells using covalent attachment of DNA. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2000; 50 Pt 3:1095–1102 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Baba A, Miyazaki M, Nagahama T, Nogi Y. Microbulbifer chitinilyticus sp. nov. and Microbulbifer okinawensis sp. nov., chitin-degrading bacteria isolated from mangrove forests. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2011; 61:2215–2220 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Jeong SH, Yang S-H, Jin HM, Kim JM, Kwon KK et al. Microbulbifer gwangyangensis sp. nov. and Microbulbifer pacificus sp. nov., isolated from marine environments. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2013; 63:1335–1341 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Kämpfer P, Arun AB, Young C-C, Rekha PD, Martin K et al. Microbulbifer taiwanensis sp. nov., isolated from coastal soil. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2012; 62:2485–2489 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Wayne LG, Moore WEC, Stackebrandt E, Kandler O, Colwell RR et al. Report of the ad hoc Committee on reconciliation of approaches to bacterial Systematics. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 1987; 37:463–464 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003945
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003945
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplements

Supplementary material 1

PDF

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error