1887

Abstract

A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterial strain, DHC34, was isolated from forest soil of Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, Guangdong Province, China (112° 31′ E 23° 10′ N). It grew optimally on R2A medium at 28 °C, at pH 6.0–7.0 and in the presence of 0–1 % (w/v) NaCl. Strain DHC34 was closely related to LMG 28138 (98.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain DHC34 formed a clade with LMG 28138, which is next to but branched deeply with ICMP 2807. The phylogenetic relationships among these three strains were also supported with the phylogram based on concatenated partial B, A and B gene sequences. The phylogenomic tree generated with the UBCG tool showed that strains DHC34 and ICMP 2807 were in a different clade. The DNA–DNA relatedness values between strain DHC34 and LMG 28138 and ICMP 2807 were much lower than 70 %. Strain DHC34 contained ubiquinone 8 as the major respiratory quinone. Its major fatty acids were C, C cyclo and C cyclo ω8. The DNA G+C content of strain DHC34 was 64.2 mol%. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified aminophospholipids, four unidentified phospholipids, one unidentified aminolipid and a polar lipid. The phenotypic, phylogenetic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic data showed that strain DHC34 represents a novel species of a new genus in the family , for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of is DHC34 (=KCTC 42628=LMG 28845). On the basis of the current data, is renamed as comb. nov.

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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003932
2019-12-18
2020-01-24
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