1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacterium, strain JDX10, was isolated from a soil sample of Fildes Peninsula, Antarctica. Cells of the strain were irregular rod-shaped and non-motile. Cells grew at 4–40 °C (optimum, 28 °C), at pH 6.0–9.0 (optimum, 7.5) and with 0.0–3.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 1.0 %). According to phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain JDX10 was associated with the genus , and showed highest similarities to CCTCC AB 2013217 (97.2 %), SST-39 (96.9 %) and JCM 32157 (96.9 %). The average nucleotide identity scores of strain JDX10 to CCTCC AB 2013217 and JCM 13525 were 74.8 and 73.3 %, respectively and the Genome-to-Genome Distance Calculator scores were 19.2 and 18.7 %, respectively. The major (>10.0 %) cellular fatty acid was anteiso-C. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was MK-10(H). The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and one unidentified glycolipid. The phylogenetic analysis and physiological and biochemical data showed that strain JDX10 should be classified as representing a novel species in the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JDX10 (=MCCC 1H00351=KCTC 49242).

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2019-12-20
2020-01-24
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