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Abstract

A phototrophic bacterium, designated as strain JA983, was isolated from a freshwater pond in Gujarat, India. The strain was yellowish brown, catalase- and oxidase-positive, rod-to-oval shaped, Gram-stain-negative and motile. Growth was observed at 20–35 °C. NaCl was not required for optimum growth and up to 5 % was tolerated. Growth was observed at pH 6.0–8.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0. An unidentified glycolipid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, two unidentified aminolipids (AL1, AL2) and two unidentified lipids (L1 and L2) are the polar lipids of JA983. Q10 is the only quinone. C ω7/C  ω6 is the major fatty acid. JA983 showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strains of (98.99%), (98.99 %), (98.99 %) and other members of the genus with less than 98.7 % similarity. In a 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic tree, JA983 formed a different sub-clade with its nearest phylogenetic members of genus . Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, phylogenetic and genomic [average nucleotide identity (ANI) and digital DNA–DNA hybridization (DDH) differences indicated that JA983 is significantly different from other species of the genus and thus represents a novel species of the genus for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JA983 (=KCTC 15782=NBRC 113843).

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2019-12-05
2020-01-24
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