1887

Abstract

Strains of , thought to play vital roles in the environment for their high enzyme production capacity, are ubiquitous in various ecosystems. During an analysis of bacterial diversity in saline soil, a Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, chitin-degrading bacterial strain, designated SJ-36, was isolated from saline-alkaline soil sampled at Tumd Right Banner, Inner Mongolia, PR China. Strain SJ-36 grew at 4–40 °C (optimum, 30 °C), pH 5.0–10.0 (optimum, pH 7.0–8.0) and 0–6 % NaCl (optimum, 1.0 %). Oxidase and catalase activities were positive. A phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the phylogenomic tree both showed that strain SJ-36 formed a tight clade with KMU-14 (sharing 97.6 % 16S rRNA gene similarity) and S2-C (97.8 %). The major polar lipids of strain SJ-36 were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, two unidentified lipids and one unidentified phospholipid. The major fatty acids were iso-C (37.5 %), summed feature 9 (14.0 %; iso-Cω9 and/or C 10-methyl) and iso-C (10.6 %). Q-8 was the predominant ubiquinone. Its genomic DNA GC content was 66.6 mol%. The average nucleotide identity values of strain SJ-36 to KMU-14, S2-C and other type strains were 81.5, 79.1 and <79.0 %, respectively. The results of physiological, phenotypic and phylogenetic characterizations allowed the discrimination of strain SJ-36 from its phylogenetic relatives. sp. nov. is therefore proposed with strain SJ-36 (=CGMCC 1.16756=KCTC 43039) as the type strain.

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2019-12-18
2020-01-27
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