1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming and oval-shaped bacterium, designated strain BO-16 was isolated from activated sludge. In this study, we describe the taxonomic characterization and classification of this bacterium by using the polyphasic approach. Growth of BO-16 was observed at 10–40 °C (optimum, 25–37 °C) and at pH 5.0–10.0 (optimum, pH 7.0) on R2A agar. The major fatty acids it contained were -C, -C and -C and the major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine. This isoprenoid quinones included MK-8 (H) and MK-8 (H). The peptidoglycan contained lysine, serine, alanine, glycine and glutamic acid and represented the peptidoglycan type A4. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, BO-16 was shown to represent a member of the genus and to be related to KACC 18597 (98.4 % sequence similarity), KCTC 39536 (97.5 %), DSM 24460 (97.4 %) and KCTC 39625 (97.3 %). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 68.0 mol%. The DNA–DNA relatedness values between BO-16 and its closest phylogenetic neighbours were much lower than 70 %. BO-16 could be differentiated phylogenetically and phenotypically from the species of the genus with validly published names. Therefore the isolate represents a novel species, for which the name sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain BO-16 (=KACC 19647=LMG 30859)

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Wan-Taek Im , Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology
  • Wan-Taek Im , National Institute of Biological Resources
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003910
2019-12-04
2020-11-24
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