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Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, facultative anaerobic, motile and straight rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain C1-9, was isolated from rhizosphere soil of (L.) O. Ktze collected from a tea garden in Huize, south-western PR China. Cells were oxidase-positive and catalase-negative. Growth occurred at 20–40 °C and pH 6.0–10.0, with an optimal growth at 30 °C and pH 7.0. The respiratory quinone was detected as ubiquinone-8 (Q-8). The major fatty acids were identified as summed feature 3 (Cω7 and/or Cω6), C and summed feature 8 (Cω7 or Cω6). The cellular polar lipids contained phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified phospholipids, two unidentified lipids, one unidentified aminophospholipid and one unidentified aminolipid. The polyamine types were detected as 1,8-diaminooctane and 2-hydroxyputrescine. The genomic DNA G+C content was 68.6 mol%. Based on the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain C1-9 (MF687442) showed highest sequence similarity to DSM 19570 (97.1 %). The phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain C1-9 clustered close to DSM 19570, CCTCC AB 2014193 and species belonging to the genera and . The phylogenomic tree indicated that strain C1-9 formed a clade with . The average nucleotide identity value was 76.0 % between strain C1-9 and DSM 19570, which is lower than the prokaryotic species delineation threshold of 95.0–96.0 %. The polyphasic taxonomic characteristics indicated that strain C1-9 represents a novel species of a new genus within the order , for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain C1-9 = KCTC 62325=CGMCC 1.13864) is proposed.

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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003878
2019-11-25
2019-12-09
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