1887

Abstract

Two Gram-positive, rod-shaped, motile, endospore-forming strains, SYSU K30003 and SYSU K30004, were isolated from cave soil sampled in Xingyi County, Guizhou Province, south-west PR China. The 16S rRNA gene sequence results indicated that strains SYSU K30003 and SYSU K30004 had highest sequence similarities to DSM 26310 (93.2 %) and KCTC 33185 (97.8 %), respectively. Optimum growth for both strains occurred at pH 7.0 and 37 °C. Both strains contained -2,6-diaminopimelic acid in their cell-wall peptidoglycan and MK-7 was the only isoprenoid quinone detected. The polar lipid profile of strain SYSU K30004 consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, two aminophospholipids, an unidentified glycolipid, unidentified phospholipids and two unidentified polar lipids. The polar lipid profile of strain SYSU K30003 contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified glycolipid. The major fatty acids (>5 %) of strain SYSU K30003 were anteiso-C C, anteiso-C and iso-C, while those of strain SYSU K30004 were anteiso-C, C, anteiso-C, iso-C, iso-C and iso-C. The genome G+C contents of strains SYSU K30003 and SYSU K30004 were 59.0 and 53.6 mol%, respectively. The average nucleotide identity values between strains SYSU K30003 and SYSU K30004 and other closely related members were below the cut-off level (95–96 %) for species identification. Based on the results of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genome analyses, strains SYSU K30003 and SYSU K30004 represent two novel species of the genus , for which the names sp. nov. and sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains are SYSU K30003 (=KCTC 33956=CGMCC 1.13505) and SYSU K30004 (=KCTC 33957=CGMCC 1.13872).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Research Fund of Education Bureau of Guizhou Province, PR China (Award (2018) 481)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Ying-Qian Kang
  • Foundation of Science and Technology Bureau of Guiyang City, China (Award (2017) 5-19)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Ying-Qian Kang
  • Talent Base Project of Guizhou Province, China (Award FCJD2018-22)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Ying-Qian Kang
  • Excellent Youth Talent Training Project of Guizhou Province (Award (2017) 5639)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Ying-Qian Kang
  • Guizhou Scientific Plan Project (Award (2019) 2873)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Ying-Qian Kang
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 31600015)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Bao-Zhu Fang
  • Jiangsu Provincial Key Research and Development Program (Award 2017YFD0200503)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Wen-Jun Li
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2019-11-20
2021-10-24
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