1887

Abstract

species are vector-borne parasitic bacteria with unusual, highly fragmented genomes that include a linear chromosome and linear as well as circular plasmids that differ numerically between and within various species. Strain CA690, which was cultivated from a questing nymph in the San Francisco Bay area, CA, was determined to be genetically distinct from all other described species belonging to the complex. The genome, including plasmids, was assembled using a hybrid assembly of short Illumina reads and long reads obtained via Oxford Nanopore Technology. We found that strain CA690 has a main linear chromosome containing 902176 bp with a identity ≤91 % compared with other species chromosomes and five linear and two circular plasmids. A phylogeny based on 37 single-copy genes of the main linear chromosome and rooted with the relapsing fever species strain Ly revealed that strain CA690 had a sister-group relationship with, and occupied a basal position to, species occurring in North America. We propose to name this species sp. nov. The type strain, CA690, has been deposited in two national culture collections, DSMZ (=107169) and ATCC (=TSD-160)

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2019-12-03
2019-12-09
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