1887

Abstract

A rod-shaped, Gram-stain-positive bacterial strain, MS74, was isolated from soil beside Itaewon road, Seoul, Republic of Korea. The strain could grow well on R2A, nutrient agar and tryptone soya agar, but not in LB agar. MS74 tolerated 3.0 % NaCl (w/v), pH 9.0 and a temperature range from 10 to 35 °C (optimal temperature, 28 °C). From the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequence, the strain is most closely related to CCUG 53270 CFH S0170, JCM 16352 and YN2 with similarity percentages of 96.6 %, 96.4 %, 95.9 % and 95.8 % respectively. Major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The major menaquinone was MK-7. The fatty acids profile mainly consisted of C anteiso, C iso, C iso, and C. The DNA G+C content of the isolated strain determined from the whole-genome sequence was 51 mol%. MS74 had an average nucleotide identity (ANI) value of 73.9 % and a digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) value of 20.6 % with most closely related strain, CCUG 53270. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotypic and genotypic evidence, the isolate was identified as representing a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MS74 (=KACC 19385 =DSM 105496)

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2019-10-29
2019-11-21
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