1887

Abstract

Four strains of bacteria designated as AR-3-6, AT-3–1, AR-3-8 and AR-3–15 were isolated from Arctic soil. Cells were aerobic, Gram-staining-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and yellow-pigmented. Flexirubin-type pigments were present in all strains. All strains tolerated 2 % of NaCl and were psychrotolerant. A phylogenetic analysis based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that these strains formed a lineage within the family that were distinct from various members of the genus . The closest member of strain AR-3-6 was DSM 19938 (97.2 % sequence similarity) and AR-3-8 was HHS 11 (97.9 %). The predominant respiratory quinone was menaqinone-7. The major polar lipid was phosphatidylethanolamine. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (Cω7c and/or Cω6), iso-C, Cω5 and iso-C 3-OH. The DNA G+C content of strains ranges from 40.1 to 42.1 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analysis, both strains AR-3-6 and AR-3-8 represent a novel member in the genus , for which the name sp. nov. and sp. nov. are proposed, respectively. The type strain of is AR-3-6 (=KEMB 9005–743=KACC 21172=NBRC 113790) and type strain of is AR-3-8 (=KEMB 9005–744= KACC 21173=NBRC 113791).

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2019-10-24
2019-11-12
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