1887

Abstract

Polyphasic taxonomic analysis was performed to characterize a novel bacterium, which was isolated from surface sediment of the Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica, and designated as R04H25. The cells of the isolate were Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile, slightly curved rods. Growth occurred at 4–42 °C, pH 7.0–9.5, and in 1–15 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain R04H25 formed an independent lineage within the genus and its nearest neighbours were 908033 (98.2 %), PIM1 (98.1 %), W11 (97.8 %), 908087 (97.1 %) and PIN1 (97.0 %). The average nucleotide identities between strain R04H25 and the nearest neighbours were 76.2–77.7 %. The major fatty acids were iso-C, summed feature 9, iso-C, C and iso-C 3-OH. The polar lipids comprised phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified aminophospholipid, three unidentified glycolipids and two unidentified lipids. The predominant respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 8. The genomic DNA G+C content was 48.2 mol%. On the basis of the phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic results, we propose a novel species named as sp. nov. in the genus , with the type strain R04H25 (=GDMCC 1.1503=KCTC 62911).

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2019-11-07
2019-11-18
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