1887

Abstract

is a Gram-stain-positive bacillus derived from otorrhea. Four strains derived from ear discharges in Canada and Switzerland, with features consistent with but distinguishable from IMMIB L-1656 (accession number FN554542) by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (97.5 % similarity), were thought to represent a novel species of the genus . DSM 45359 (=IMMIB L-1656) was acquired to compare with Canadian and Swiss strains by whole-genome sequencing (WGS). Unexpectedly, those isolates were observed to be consistent with DSM 45359 by WGS (ANIb scores >98 %), MALDI-TOF (Bruker), cellular fatty acid analysis and biochemically (some differences were observed). A nearly full 16S rRNA gene sequence could not be readily prepared from DSM 45359, even after multiple attempts. A 16S rRNA gene chimeric consensus sequence created from the genome assembly of DSM 45359 had only 97.5 % similarity to that of IMMIB L-1656, implying that 16S rRNA sequence accession number FN554542 could not be replicated. We concluded that our isolates of members of the genus were consistent with DSM 45359, did not represent a novel species, and that the sequence corresponding to FN554542 was not reproducible. By WGS, DSM 45359 had genome of 2.53×10 bp with a DNA G+C content of 59.34%, while genomes of Canadian and Swiss isolates ranged from 2.47 to 2.59×10 bp with DNA G+C contents of 59.3–59.52 %. NML 100628 (=NCTC 14178=LMG 30897) did not demonstrate a rodcoccus cycle. Emendation of was proposed based on these results.

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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003719
2019-10-09
2019-10-22
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