1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, rod shaped, non-motile, aerobic bacterium (strain JC507) was isolated from a yeast ( JY101). Strain JC507 was oxidase- and catalase-positive. Complete 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison data indicated that strain JC507 was a member of the genus and was closely related to NBRC 14944 (98.7 %), followed by CC-VM-7 (98.6 %), ATCC 35910 (98.5 %) and less than 98.5 % to other species of the genus The genomic DNA GC content of strain JC507 was 36.0 mol%. Strain JC507 had phosphatidylethanolamine, four unidentified amino lipids and four unidentified lipids. MK-6 was the only respiratory quinone. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were anteiso-C, iso-C and iso-C3OH. The average nucleotide identity and DNA–DNA hybridization values between strain JC507 and NBRC 14944, CC-VM-7 and ATCC 35910 were 80.2, 83.0 and 87.0 % and 24, 26.7 and 32.7 %, respectively. The results of phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic analyses support the inclusion of strain JC507 as a representative of a new species of the genus for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JC507 (=KCTC 52928=MCC 4072=NBRC 113872).

Keyword(s): Chryseobacterium
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2019-09-19
2019-10-23
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