1887

Abstract

We describe the isolation and characterization of three bacterial isolates from the common house fly, , caught in Londerzeel, Belgium and Huye District, Rwanda. Although isolated from distinct geographical locations, the strains show >99 % identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and are <95 % identical to type strains of species. Whole-genome sequences were obtained for all three strains. The genomes are 2.4–2.5 Mb with a G+C content of ~30.3 mol%. Bacteriological and biochemical analysis of the strains demonstrate distinctly different characteristics compared to known species. Particularly, the three strains investigated in this study can be distinguished from the known species (and ) through urease and β-glucosidase activities. Whole-cell fatty acid methyl ester analysis shows that the fatty acid composition of the novel strains is also unique. On the basis of phylogenetic, genotypic and phenotypic data, we propose to classify these isolates as representatives of a novel species of the genus sp. nov., in reference to its prevalence in house flies, with strain G8 (=LMG 30898=DSM 107922) as the type strain.

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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003667
2019-08-28
2019-10-21
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