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Abstract

Strain HMF7854, isolated from a ginkgo tree, was an orange-pigmented, Gram-stain-negative, motile by means of a single flagellum, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium. The isolate grew optimally on Reasoner's 2A agar at 30 °C, pH 7.0–8.0 and 0 % NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain HMF7854 belonged to the genus and was most closely related to HKS-06 (96.8 % sequence similarity). The major fatty acids were C ω6, summed feature 8 (Cω7 and/or Cω6), summed feature 3 (Cω7 and/or Cω6) and C. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-10. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, sphingoglycolipid, two unidentified lipids and two unidentified glycolipids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 68.4 mol%. Thus, based on its phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data, strain HMF7854 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is strain HMF7854 (=KCTC 62461=NBRC 113337).

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2019-10-01
2019-10-21
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