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Abstract

A strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile, non-pigmented bacterium, strain J115, was isolated from human faeces. Cells of strain J115 were straight rods, generally 1.8–3.0 µm, but could be up to 18 µm long. Growth occurred below 2 % (w/v) NaCl and 2 % (v/v) bile. Strain J115 produced acid from -inositol but not from -glucose, -ribose or -xylose. Butyric acid was the major end-product from -inositol. The genomic DNA G+C content was 58.92 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the closest cultivated neighbours of strain J115 were GH1 (95.4 % similarity) and Sjm18-20 (94.1 %). Strain J115 was also related to the not-yet-cultured bacterium (92–93 % similarity). Coherently with the 16S rRNA gene sequence results, the ANI scores don't have units of strain J115 to GH1 and Sjm18-20 were 73.37 and 73.24, respectively, while estimations of DNA–DNA hybridization were both 20.4 %, with confidence intervals of 18.2–22.9 % and 18.2–22.8 %, respectively. The major fatty acids were iso-C (24.2 %), C DMA (18.4 %), anteiso-C (15.2 %) and C DMA (7.6 %). No respiratory quinone was detected. Based on phenotypic features and phylogenetic position, it is proposed that this isolate represents a novel species in a new genus, gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of is J115 (DSM 106889=LMG 30601).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • European Research Council (Award Starting grant 336452-ENIGMO)
  • WELBIO (Award WELBIO-CR-2017C-02)
  • Funds Baillet Latour (Award Grant for Medical Research 2015)
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2019-06-24
2021-05-10
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