1887

Abstract

Two strains of Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, aerobic, short-rod bacteria, designated as DRYC-M-16 and WMC-M-20, were isolated from sediment samples of two saline lakes in the Tibet of China. Both of the strains were catalase- and oxidase-positive. Optimal growth of strain DRYC-M-16 occurred at 20–25 °C, pH 7.0–7.5 and with 1.5 % (w/v) NaCl concentration. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strains DRYC-M-16 and WMC-M-20 belonged to the genus , and showed the highest similarities to KCTC 23724 (96.9 %) and KCTC 62105 (96.7 %). The DNA G+C contents of strains DRYC-M-16 and WMC-M-20 were 63.0 mol% and 62.9 mol%, respectively. The main polar lipids contained phosphatidylglycerol (PG), diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and several unidentified aminophospholipid (APL), aminolipid (AL), phospholipids (PL) and lipids (L). The predominant respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q-10. The major cellular fatty acids of the two strains were iso-C and summed feature 8 (comprising C 7/C 6). Comprehensive analysis of the genotypic, physiological, biochemical and phenotypic characteristics indicated that the two strains should be classified as a novel species of the genus , proposed as sp. nov., with the type strain DRYC-M-16 (=CGMCC 1.13881=KCTC 72105 ).

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2019-08-01
2019-08-22
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