1887

Abstract

An anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming bacterium, designated strain PYR-10, was isolated from a mesophilic methanogenic consortium. Cells were 0.7–1.2×6.0–6.3 µm, straight or slightly curved rods, with flagellar motility. Growth was observed in PYG (peptone-yeast glucose) medium at pH 5.5–8.0 (optimum, pH 6.5), 30–55 °C (45 °C) and in NaCl concentrations of 0–15 g l (0 g l). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain PYR-10 belongs to the genus . The strain showed 95.4, 93.7, 93.5 and 93.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to DSM 27788, DSM 10365, DSM 525 and DSM 28650, respectively. The genomic DNA G+C content was 27.7 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain PYR-10 were iso-C, C, C DMA, anteiso-C and C. The main polar lipids were glycolipid, phosphoaminoglycolipid, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phospholipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and lipids. An unknown menaquinone was detected. 2,6-Diaminopimelic acid was not detected. The whole-cell sugars contained ribose and lower amounts of glucose. Based on the results of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic analyses, strain PYR-10 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain PYR-10 (=JCM 33161=CCAM 531=CGMCC 1.5286).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Agricultural Science and Technology Innovation Program (ASTIP), the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and the Infrastructure (Award CAAS-ASTIP-2016-BIOMA)
  • Facility Development Program of Sichuan Province (Award 2018TJPT0004)
  • Science and Technology Program of Sichuan Province, China (Award 2017JY0242)
  • Fundamental Research Funds for Central Non-profit Scientific Institution, China (Award 1610012016023)
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2019-06-14
2021-08-04
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