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Abstract

A bacterial strain M05W1-28 was isolated from a well that collected water for irrigation from a deep aquifer at a depth of 400 m. Cells were observed to be rod-shaped, non-motile, aerobic, stained Gram-negative. Optimal growth was obtained at pH 7.0 (range: 6.0–9.0), 28 °C (range: 15–37 °C) and 0 % NaCl (range: 0–1.5 %, w/v) in modified tryptic soy broth (mTSB) without added NaCl and R2A. The cells were found to be positive for catalase and oxidase activities. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were identified as summed feature 3 (C 7 / C 6) and iso-C. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, glycolipid, phosphoglycolipids, phospholipids, and unidentified lipids. The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone-7 (MK-7). The genomic G+C content of strain M05W1-28 was 40.7 %. Based on similarities of 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain M05W1-28 was affiliated with the genus , exhibiting the highest sequence similarities with LMG 8342 (97.5 %), THG07 (97.1 %) and less than 97.0 % to other members of the genus. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) and digital DNA–DNA hybridisation values (dDDH) between M05W1-28 and LMG 8342 were 78.1 and 22.5 %, respectively. Phenotypic characteristics including enzyme activities and carbon source utilisation differentiated the strain from other species. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggested that strain M05W1-28 represented a novel species within the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is M05W1-28 (=CGMCC 1.13711=KCTC 72027).

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2019-09-10
2019-09-18
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