1887

Abstract

A novel thermophilic actinomycete, designated strain 3-22-3, was isolated from mushroom compost collected in Nanning, Guangxi Province, China. The organism produced white aerial mycelium and short spore chains of non-motile oval spores with a ridged surface on the aerial mycelium. Strain 3-22-3 contained -diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. The whole-cell sugars were galactose, glucose, madurose and ribose. Major fatty acids were iso-C, iso-C, iso-C and anteiso-C. MK-9(H) and MK-9(H) were the predominant menaquinones. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside, ninhydrin-positive glycophospholipids, glycolipids and unidentified phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 72.5 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain 3-22-3 belonged to the genus and showed the highest sequence similarity to DSM 43183 (96.3 %). On the 16S rRNA gene tree of closely related species and type species of all genera in the family , strain 3-22-3 formed a distinct phyletic line together with DSM 43183. Furthermore, the chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain 3-22-3 were congruent with the description of the genus , but the morphological characteristics of strain 3-22-3 were significantly different from . Based on the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain 3-22-3 represents a novel species of the genus , and the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 3-22-3 (=CGMCC 4.7155=DSM 46802=ATCC BAA-2627).

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003515
2019-08-01
2019-09-15
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

  1. Henssen A. Beitrage zur morphologie und systematik der thermophilen Actinomyceten. Archiv Mikrobiol 1957;26:373–414 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Tsilinsky P. [On the thermophilic moulds]. Ann Inst Pasteur 1899;13:500–505 (in French)
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Mccarthy AJ, Cross T. A Taxonomic study of Thermomonospora and other Monosporic Actinomycetes. Microbiology 1984;130:5–25 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Zhang Z, Wang Y, Ruan J. Reclassification of Thermomonospora and Microtetraspora. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1998;48:411–422 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Zhang Z, Kudo T, Nakajima Y, Wang Y. Clarification of the relationship between the members of the family Thermomonosporaceae on the basis of 16S rDNA, 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer and 23S rDNA sequences and chemotaxonomic analyses. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2001;51:373–383 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Wu H, Liu B, Shao Y, Ou X, Huang F. Thermostaphylospora grisealba gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from mushroom compost and transfer of Thermomonospora chromogena Zhang et al. 1998 to Thermostaphylospora chromogena comb. nov. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2018;68:602–608 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Lechevalier MP, Lechevalier HA. The chemotaxonomy of actinomycetes. In Actinomycete Taxonomy (Special Publication 6vol. 6 Arlington, VA: Society for Industrial Microbiology; 1980; pp.227–291
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Fergus CL. Thermophilic and thermotolerant molds and actinomycetes of mushroom compost during peak heating. Mycologia 1964;56:267–284 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Wuest PJ, Fahy HK. Mushrooms compost: traits and uses. Mushroom News 1991;39:9–15
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Hayakawa M, Nonomura H. Humic acid-vitamin agar, a new medium for the selective isolation of soil actinomycetes. Journal of Fermentation Technology 1987;65:501–509 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Shirling EB, Gottlieb D. Methods for characterization of Streptomyces species. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1966;16:313–340 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Waksman SA. Classification, identification and description of genera and species. vol. II The Actinomycetes Baltimore: Williams &Wilkins; 1961
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Gause GF, Preobrazhenskaya TP, Sveshnikova MA, Terekhova LP, Maximova TS et al. A guide for the determination of actinomycetes. Genera Streptomyces, Streptoverticillium, and Chaina Moscow: Nauka; 1983
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Jones KL. Fresh isolates of actinomycetes in which the presence of sporogenous aerial mycelia is a fluctuating characteristic. J Bacteriol 1949;57:141–145[PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Kelly KL. Inter-Society Color Council-National Bureau of Standards Color-Name Charts Illustrated with Centroid Colors Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office; 1964
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Gordon RE, Barnett DA, Handerhan JE, Pang CHN. Nocardia coeliaca, Nocardia autotrophica, and the Nocardin Strain. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1974;24:54–63 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Williams ST, Goodfellow M, Alderson G, Wellington EM, Sneath PH et al. Numerical classification of Streptomyces and related genera. J Gen Microbiol 1983;129:1743–1813 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Hasegawa T, Takizawa M, Tanida S. A rapid analysis for chemical grouping of aerobic actinomycetes. J Gen Appl Microbiol 1983;29:319–322 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Minnikin DE, O'Donnell AG, Goodfellow M, Alderson G, Athalye M et al. An integrated procedure for the extraction of bacterial isoprenoid quinones and polar lipids. J Microbiol Methods 1984;2:233–241 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Collins MD, Howarth OW, Grund E, Kroppenstedt RM. Isolation and structural determination of new members of the vitamin K 2 series in Nocardia brasiliensis. FEMS Microbiol Lett 1987;41:35–39 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Kroppenstedt RM. Separation of bacterial menaquinones by HPLC using reverse phase (RP18) and a silver loaded ion exchanger as stationary phases. J Liq Chromatogr 1982;5:2359–2367 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Minnikin DE, Hutchinson IG, Caldicott AB, Goodfellow M. Thin-layer chromatography of methanolysates of mycolic acid-containing bacteria. J Chromatogr A 1980;188:221–233 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Uchida K, Kudo T, Suzuki KI, Nakase T. A new rapid method of glycolate test by diethyl ether extraction, which is applicable to a small amount of bacterial cells of less than one milligram. J Gen Appl Microbiol 1999;45:49–56 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Mesbah M, Premachandran U, Whitman WB. Precise measurement of the G+C content of deoxyribonucleic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989;39:159–167 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Yoon SH, Ha SM, Kwon S, Lim J, Kim Y et al. Introducing EzBioCloud: a taxonomically united database of 16S rRNA gene sequences and whole-genome assemblies. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2017;67:1613–1617 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Yoon SH, Ha SM, Lim J, Kwon S, Chun J. A large-scale evaluation of algorithms to calculate average nucleotide identity. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 2017;110:1281–1286 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Thompson JD, Gibson TJ, Plewniak F, Jeanmougin F, Higgins DG. The CLUSTAL_X windows interface: flexible strategies for multiple sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools. Nucleic Acids Res 1997;25:4876–4882 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Saitou N, Nei M. The neighbor-joining method: a new method for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Mol Biol Evol 1987;4:406–425 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Felsenstein J. Evolutionary trees from DNA sequences: a maximum likelihood approach. J Mol Evol 1981;17:368–376 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Fitch WM. Toward defining the course of evolution: minimum change for a specific tree topology. Syst Zool 1971;20:406–416 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Kumar S, Stecher G, Tamura K. MEGA7: Molecular evolutionary genetics analysis version 7.0 for bigger datasets. Mol Biol Evol 2016;33:1870–1874 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Kimura M. A simple method for estimating evolutionary rates of base substitutions through comparative studies of nucleotide sequences. J Mol Evol 1980;16:111–120 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Felsenstein J. Confidence limits on phylogenies: an approach using the bootstrap. Evolution 1985;39:783–791 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Greiner-Mai E, Kroppenstedt RM, Korn-Wendisch F, Kutzner HJ. Morphological and biochemical characterization and emended descriptions of thermophilic actinomycetes species. Syst Appl Microbiol 1987;9:97–109 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Goris J, Konstantinidis KT, Klappenbach JA, Coenye T, Vandamme P et al. DNA-DNA hybridization values and their relationship to whole-genome sequence similarities. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2007;57:81–91 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Richter M, Rosselló-Móra R. Shifting the genomic gold standard for the prokaryotic species definition. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2009;106:19126–19131 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Kim M, Oh HS, Park SC, Chun J. Towards a taxonomic coherence between average nucleotide identity and 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity for species demarcation of prokaryotes. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2014;64:346–351 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Jiao JY, Liu L, Zhou EM, Wei DQ, Ming H et al. Actinomadura amylolytica sp. nov. and Actinomadura cellulosilytica sp. nov., isolated from geothermally heated soil. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 2015;108:75–83 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003515
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003515
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplementary File 1

PDF

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error