1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile, short-rod bacterium, strain MS2-2, was isolated from mangrove sediment sampled at Jiulong River Estuary, Fujian province, PR China. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis showed that strain MS2-2 was most closely related to 20V17 (97.41 %) and PrR001 (96.18 %). Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA genes and genome sequences both revealed that strain MS2-2 formed a distinct cluster with 20V17 and PrR001 within family , quite separate from other type species in the genus . The average nucleotide identity value between strain MS2-2 and 20V17 was 78.35 %. Growth of strain MS2-2 was observed at 16–41 ° C (optimum, 34 ° C), pH 3.6–7.5 (pH 6.0) and 0.5–10.0 % (w/v) NaCl (4.0 %). The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (Cω7 and/or Cω6), C and C. Ubiquinone 10 was the sole quinone. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The DNA G+C content was 67.9 mol%. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain MS2-2 represents a novel species of a novel genus in the family , for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain MS2-2 (=MCCC 1K02682=NBRC 112978). We also propose the reclassification of as comb. nov. and as comb. nov.

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2019-08-01
2019-09-22
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