1887

Abstract

Two Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, facultatively anaerobic, iron-reducing bacterial strains, designated M2 and R106, were isolated from pelagic surface-sediment of the Ross Sea, Antarctica. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strains M2 and R106 were affiliated to the genus and formed a distinct subline in a robust clade encompassing , , and with a range of sequence similarities of 98.1–98.9 %. Overall genome relatedness indices indicated that M2 and R106 represented a single genomic species, which was clearly distinguishable from the phylogenetically close relatives with lower values of species delineation thresholds. Cells of M2 grew optimally at 10–15 °C and pH 6.5 in the presence of 3.0–4.0 % (w/v) sea salts. The polar lipids of M2 comprised phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminophospholipids, an unidentified aminolipid and an unidentified phospholipid. Quinones were Q-7, Q-8, MK-7 and MMK-7. The major cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were Cω7 and/or Cω6, C and Cω8. The DNA G+C content was 42.2 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic, phylogenetic, genomic and chemotaxonomic features, we propose the name sp. nov. with the type strain M2 (=KCCM 43257 =JCM 32090) and the reclassification of as a later heterotypic synonym of .

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2019-08-01
2019-10-20
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