1887

Abstract

A novel bacterial strain, JDX94, was isolated from tundra soil sampled north of the Yellow River station, Arctic. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, short rod-shaped and aerobic. The strain displayed growth at 4–37 °C with an optimum at 28 °C, with 0–1.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0%) and at pH 6.0–9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0–7.5). Cells contained summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1 ω7c and/or C16 : 1 ω6c), iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH as its major cellular fatty acids and menaquinone-7 as the only respiratory quinone. The polar lipid profile of strain JDX94 consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids and four unknown polar lipids. The DNA G+C content was 37.5 mol%. On the basis 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison, strain JDX94 showed the highest sequence similarity (96.7 %) to Pedobacteragri JCM 15120, followed by Pedobacteralluvionis DSM 19624 (96.3 %). Furthermore, the average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values between strain JDX94 and related species of the genus Pedobacter were 74.6–79.2 % and 18.9–24.5 %, respectively. Based on the presented results, we propose a novel species for which the name Pedobacter chinensis sp. nov. is suggested, with the type strain JDX94 (=MCCC 1H00335= KCTC 62850).

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2019-06-03
2019-09-20
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