1887

Abstract

An isolate of strictly aerobic, pale-pink pigmented bacteria, strain AF10, was obtained from an organic soil layer in forested tundra, Nadym region, West Siberia. Cells of strain AF10 were Gram-negative, non-motile rods that produced an amorphous extracellular polysaccharide-like substance and formed large cell aggregates in old cultures. These bacteria were chemoorganotrophic, mildly acidophilic and psychrotolerant, and grew between pH 3.5 and 7.0 (optimum, pH 4.5–5.0) and at temperatures between 2 and 30 °C. The preferred growth substrates were sugars and some polysaccharides. The major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0, C16 : 1∆9 c and 13,16-dimethyl octacosanedioic acid. The genome of strain AF10 was 6.14 Mbp in size and encoded a wide repertoire of carbohydrate active enzymes. The genomic DNA G+C content was 59.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that strain AF10 is a member of the genus Granulicella, family Acidobacteriaceae , but displays 94.4–98.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to currently described members of this genus. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, phylogenetic and genomic analyses, we propose to classify this bacterium as representing a novel species of the genus Granulicella, Granulicella sibirica sp. nov. Strain AF10 (=DSM 104461=VKM B-3276) is the type strain.

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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.003290
2019-02-18
2020-01-21
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