1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile and facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated AM505, was isolated from Shuangdao Bay in Weihai, China. Cells of strain AM505 were 0.4–0.8 µm wide, 1.3–3.3 µm long, catalase-positive and oxidase-positive. Strain AM505 was tolerant to moderate salt conditions. Growth occurred at 4–40 °C (optimum, 28–33 °C), pH 6.5–9.5 (pH 7.5–8.0) and with 0.5–9.0 % NaCl (w/v; 2.0–4.0 %). A phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain AM505 was a member of the genus Pararhodobacter within the family Rhodobacteraceae. The most closely related neighbour was Pararhodobacter aggregans DSM 18938 (97.6 %). The average nucleotide identity value between AM505 and P. aggregans DSM 18938 was 75.3 %. The major respiratory quinone of strain AM505 was ubiquinone-10 and the predominant cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were summed feature 8 (consisting of C18 : 1 ω7c and/or C18 : 1 ω6c), 11-methyl C18 : 1 ω7c and C18 : 0. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and an unidentified aminolipid. The genomic DNA G+C content was 63.0 mol%. Based on our polyphasic taxonomic study, strain AM505 should be a novel species in the genus Pararhodobacter , for which the name Pararhodobacter oceanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AM505 (=KCTC 62407=MCCC 1H00289).

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2019-01-29
2019-10-17
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