1887

Abstract

A Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, non-spore forming, non-motile, non-pigmented bacterial strain, designated H184, was isolated from human faeces. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain H184 represents a member of the genus Butyricimonas . Strain H184 is related to but distinct from Butyricimonas virosa JCM 15149 and Butyricimonas paravirosa JCM 18677, with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 96.32 and 96.24 %, respectively. Strain H184 shared 90.50 % hsp60 gene sequence similarity to B. virosa JCM 15149 and B. paravirosa JCM 18677. Growth occurs between 25 and 42 °C with an optimum at 37 °C. Bile and NaCl concentration range allowing growth are 0–3.75 % and 0–1.8 %, respectively. pH range for growth is 5.5–8. The strain produced propionate as the major end product from glucose. The major cellular fatty acids of strain H184 were iso-C15 : 0 (63.5 %) and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (12.8%). The major menaquinone of the strain was MK-10 (86 %). DNA G+C content of the isolate H184 was 44.2 mol%. The genome-based comparison between strain H184 and B. virosa JCM 15149 by pairwise average nucleotide identity indicated a clear distinction with a score of 87.22. On the basis of these data, strain H184 represents a novel species of the genus Butyricimonas , for which the name Butyricimonas faecalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of B. faecalis is H184 (DSM 106867, LMG 30602).

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2019-02-01
2019-09-15
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