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Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, aerobic bacterial strain, designated T17 was isolated from a sample of sewage sediment from a Busan park (Republic of Korea). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain T17 had the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Dyadobacter soli KCTC 22481 (97.3 %), D.yadobacter fermentans DSM 18053 (97.1 %) and D.yadobacter sediminis CGMCC 1.12895 (97.1 %). The isolate exhibited relatively low levels of DNA–DNA relatedness with respect to D. soli KCTC 22481 (28.2±3.6 %). The DNA G+C content was 49.1 mol%. The unique respiratory quinone was MK-7 and the major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, five unidentified lipids, four aminolipids, two unidentified phospholipids and one glycophospholipid. The predominant cellular fatty acids (>5 % of total) were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH; 44.3 %), iso-C15 : 0 (15.7 %), C16 : 1 ω5c (9.6 %), iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (9.3 %) and C16 : 0 (5.6 %). Moreover, physiological and biochemical characteristics distinguished strain T17 from its related species, including temperature and pH ranges for growth, being positive for acetate hydrolysis, and being negative for acid produced from melibiose and rhamnose. The genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data revealed that strain T17 represents a novel species of the genus Dyadobacter , for which the name Dyadobacter luticola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is T17 (=KCTC 52981=CCTCC AB 2017091).

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2018-12-19
2019-10-21
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