1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, motile by one polar flagellum, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as 190, was isolated from seawater of the West Pacific Ocean and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic investigation. Colonies were 1.0–2.0 mm in diameter, smooth, circular, convex and white after growth on marine agar at 30 °C for 24 h. Strain 190 was found to grow at 4–40 °C (optimum, 30 °C), at pH 5.5–10.5 (optimum, pH 6.5) and with 0.5–12.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2.0 %). Chemotaxonomic analysis showed the sole respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 8 (Q-8), and the major fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1 ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0 and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1 ω6c and/or C18 : 1 ω7c). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), one unidentified aminolipid (AL1) and two unidentified glycolipids (GL1, GL2). The DNA G+C content of strain 190 was 48.7 mol% based on the genome sequence. The comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities showed that strain 190 was closely related to Alteromonas oceani S35 (99.6 % sequence similarity), A. lipolytica JW12 (98.2 %), A. aestuariivivens JDTF-113 (97.7 %) and A. mediterranea DE (97.5 %); it exhibited 97.0 % or less sequence similarity with the type strains of other species with validly published names. Phylogenetic trees reconstructed with the neighbour-joining, maximum-parsimony and maximum-likelihood methods based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain 190 constituted a separate branch with A. oceani , A. confluentis , A. aestuariivivens and A. lipolytica in a clade of the genus Alteromonas . OrthoANI values between strain 190 and A. oceani S35 and A. lipolytica JW12 were 93.5 and 77.9 %, respectively, and in silico DNA–DNA hybridization values were 53.8 and 21.2 %, respectively. Differential phenotypic properties, together with phylogenetic distinctiveness, demonstrated that strain 190 is clearly distinct from recognized species of the genus Alteromonas . On the basis of these features, we propose that strain 190 (=MCCC 1K03456=KCTC 62227) represents a novel species of the genus Alteromonas with the name Alteromonas alba sp. nov.

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2019-01-04
2022-01-18
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